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Kristian Haugen. Photo: Helene Spurkeland

Walkway guard

about 1 month ago
Written by Helene Spurkeland, Ronald Toppe
Life on board > Walkway guard

Walkway guard

about 1 month agoLife on board
Written by Helene Spurkeland, Ronald Toppe
Kristian Haugen. Photo: Helene Spurkeland

The system for keeping track of who is on board the Statsraad Lehmkuhl and who is ashore is as ancient as it is ingenious.

One of the worst things that can happen to a crewmember is to be left behind. Stand there on the dock and watch the stern of your ship disappear into the distance, without your ship's bag and without your next payment.

It is also a big problem if a guest on board does not get ashore before the moorings are thrown.

Simple and ingenious. Photo: Helene Spurkeland
Simple and ingenious. Photo: Helene Spurkeland

The system used to keep track is as old as it is simple and ingenious. The lid of a wooden box is full of numbered holes. Everyone sailing with the ship gets their own number, the same as the number on your locker and hammock.

In the holes there is room for small brass pins. If the pin is in place, it means that the person is on board, no pin means that the person is ashore.

Visitors are checked specially. Photo: Helene Spurkeland
Visitors are checked specially. Photo: Helene Spurkeland
The guest log. Photo: Helene Spurkeland
The guest log. Photo: Helene Spurkeland
Polite and friendly behavior is part of the job as a walkway guard. Photo: Helene Spurkeland
Polite and friendly behavior is part of the job as a walkway guard. Photo: Helene Spurkeland

Visitors are checked specially, and their names and time of visiting are recorded in a separate log book.

In Manila, Kristian Haugen is the walkway guard, and responsible for the brass pins. It is also Kristian's responsibility to see that all fenders are in place, and that the moorings are in order.

You occasionally see large metal washers attached to the mooring ropes. They are there to prevent rats from sneaking on board the ship. It also happens that two-legged stowaways use the moorings to get on board, so Kristian has a responsible job in the tropical heat.

A responsible, and hot job. Photo: Helene Spurkeland
A responsible at hot job. Photo: Helene Spurkeland
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The One Ocean Expedition is a circumnavigation by the Norwegian tall ship Statsraad Lehmkuhl. We aim to to share knowledge about the crucial role of the ocean for a sustainable development in a global perspective.

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